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that day. >> we must get in this revolution, and complete the revolution. for in the delta of mississippi, in southwest georgia, the black belt of alabama, in harlem, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis. and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to
finishing up my new book and this particular chapter is about sex. apparently mississippi is the dumbest state. that would concur in the sex chapter because they have the most std's in america. >> mississippi is burning. >> wow. >> bill, ninety 8% of the people sur -- 98% of the people surveyed say the worst state is whatever one you happen to be in at the time. thought? >> i don't like the theme of the show. this study proved the united states of america is like one big new york apartment. we don't know anything about our neighbors and everything we know is completely wrong. i brought this back to new york because we are rude and era gapt. arrogant. >> new york won best sports fans. you can make a case or not. but it also won worst sports fans. the last time i checked boston is not in new york. >> you just proved your point. >> coming up, what is it like to be owned more than anybody else on twitter. first, what is up with the obama's new dog? something impeachable i'm sure. pbjócqkb+ámñt>zyû >> sunny is a portuguese water dog. clearly we must discuss this important news in the -- >
trying to change b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and th
of the rain stays east of the mississippi and more severe storms headed into the northeast on friday. and we get rid of everything on saturday. saturday looks better in the northeast. if you are going to jones beach and along the cape, 81 in boston. it will be nice for saturday. showers in the mid atlantic all the way back here along the mississippi. still dry across the west with the exception of areas across northern washington and northern montana. 83 in kansas city on sunday. we dry out in the nation's midsection. on monday we are looking at showers in arkansas, oklahoma, down in the southeast. still 78 in chicago. we're not shaking the cooler than average weather around the great lakes. 96 in salt lake city. wednesday looks quiet with the exception of the southeast. what's new? you can get the latest weather weekday mornings on wake up with al at 5:30. ♪ [ bats squealing ] we weren't really morning people. we're vampires after all. then we tried this nutri-grain fruit crunch bar. it's so crunchy. crunchy granola, mmmm... made with real fruit, 20 grams of whole grains. now, we love mor
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
i was even lower than a working bee. mississippi for the first part of the summer knowing that there was lots of talk about the march on washington, not knowing if it would ever come to be but mississippi was the last of the states where there had been no demonstrations. but not mississippi. halfway through the summer, i got a call saying "it's going to happen, eleanor. and buy yard is going to do it." he said, "come on up if you want to work on the staff." byyard us are on the. states who could have organized that march. >> ifill: what do you mean? >> there were a set of skills that we had no reason to have so nurtured. there had never been a mass march on washington that anyone. there had been all kind ofmarchs march. what would it take to organize such a march with no experience, no precedent to draw from. >> ifill: no social media, no flash mobs. with only telephones and the usual old-fashioned 20th century means of communication. on.l, first it took it took someone -- and i think buyard put it all in one. he had been a pass f.i.s.edworln civil disobedience in leavenwo
28th, 1955, emmett till was dragged from his cousin's home in mississippi and lynched. that lynching was part of what launched a civil rights movement. in 1963 on august 28th, dr. king stood and articulated a dream for the nation. on august 28th, 2008, president obama or then senator obama stood and accepted the nomination of the democratic party for the u.s. presidency. today, he will speak to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march. from that lynching on august 28th to this moment of an african-american president on august 28th, there have been real accomplishments. there have been real changes. we have to acknowledge that, in fact, we have made progress as a country. at the same time, that we must absolutely recognize the continuing structural barriers that exist in terms of economic inequality, unfairness in the workplace, lack of opportunity in housing, often lack of opportunity in education from k through 12, as well as in higher education, and, of course, the realities of continuing residential segregation that impact everything from our health to our opportunities to ge
. and some showers and thunderstorms from mississippi to virginia. also be some scattered showers in the northeast. >> mostly 80s across the midwest and northeast. 90s for much of the south. and dallas is the hot spot at 104 degrees. >>> heading towards extinction. the standard feature you may not see the next time you buy a new car. >>> and a town in shock. fresh questions about how a large snake killed two children while they slept. >>> also new this morning a delivery truck goes airborne. we're learning more about how this happened and the driver under arrest in connection with the crash. ♪ when you recognize something isn't right, he call to the vetera crisis line at 1-800-273-8255 and press 1. >>> president obama visiting phoenix today, to reach out to the middle class about home ownership. the president will propose overhauling the mortgage finance system. he wants to phase out fannie mae and freddie mac. it would replace private firms to secure mortgages while the government provides oversight and insurance. >>> new money is buying out a piece of the old media. jeff besoz
that hillary cited her speech and she did cite examples were in the south, mississippi, texas, florida, south carolina. she is suggesting that since 1965 and 2013 the white people in the south are irrevocably racist and cannot be trusted. half of the country below the mason-dixon line still cannot be trusted and this is a person who wants to be president of the entire united states and this is the basis on which she's going to run to turn out as jason suggested, black voter turnout. in 2005 the federal election reform commission headed by jimmy carter and former secretary of state jim baker said that voter i. dchlt laws should be promoted because they will enfranchise black voters. she's suggesting that no one could possibly disagree with her. well, serious people do disagree with her on this. >> let me ask a political question, jason. what is the benefit for republicans pushing -- that's what they're doing -- a lot of these states are pushing this are republicans. not universally, but in north carolina the government flipped. the republicans pushed some of these laws. are they getting much o
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
they were going to do some things that they previously would never have done. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every senatorto cast a ballot. leahy is doing that. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom
as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. it's just fantastic. >> there's no way in the world we ever believed we'd live long enough to see a black president. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> i cried, because it never occurred to me that i would live long enough to see a black man become president of the united states. >> for a black man in this societies, there's always been this need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public, because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still had to take the risk. i love bang black man in america, because it means that there's still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizens the way that's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american, you're a black american, but you really aren't an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans, we'll be
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
of the mississippi. youre starting to quiet down. you're away from the hustle and bustle of the world. and the movement of the river and all that really does settle you down. professional river guide, michael clark, leads the camping expedition. with the setting sun after a hard day of paddling we reach our first destination an uninhabited sand bar known as mosenthein island. hiking into the forest we search for dry ground. heavy rains and the swelling river make it a challenge. but no worries if youre new to this because clark and the 'big muddy adventures' team knows where to go. theres really not a lot of
's that for a variety of weather. ? temperatures now at 94 at dallas. 93 attacks in mississippi. look at the cooler air and a pool of ear infections of ontario. quite interesting. a high yesterday. the key here has been extraordinary. that is not uncommon in texas to have long strings of warm weather. this has been persistent heat. for us we are in the sun and watching this field of cumulus clouds. those are the ones that might produce scattered thunderstorms. look at this we have had 2.96 in. of rain since july. the normal is quite a bit more than that. this ranks among the driest 27% all year since july 1st to occur here in 142 years of data. only 64% of average. that is why we have been hearing from folks that it is a little bit dry. rainfall projections but is around half an inch. the amounts never fall evenly. that is assault normal amount of rent. and this summer that has also been a little cooler than average. 6.7 degrees cooler than last summer. only 7¢ a degree below the historic average for summer. it has been a near normal for summer. it seems cool. june july and august have all shown sligh
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
battered much of the southeast is again present flash floods and record rainfall. gulfport, mississippi got hit the worst receiving roughly 6 in. of rain. the rising rotor's covered roads, stalled cars and stranded drivers. the airport reportedly received more than 4.5 in. of rain in one hour. the heaviest rain has moved out and more showers are in the forecast. well for that reason for central idaho is now blocking more than 100,000 a.. lightning ignited the beaver creek fire almost two weeks ago. weather has helped firefighters but by last night it was only 5 percent contained. 2200 homes had been evacuated >> prison authorities examining information relating to the death of princess diana and her boyfriend. scotland yard is not saying what the information is, only that officers are assessing the relevance and credibility. the telegraph reports detectives were looking into claims princess diana was murdered by a member of the british military. the couple was killed and a high-speed crash in paris 16 years ago well, what he was chasing them. prince william set down for his first off
right. pull out, everybody. i'll let you watch. >> mississippi. 7 mississippi. fail. >> and in fact, the car flips over. >> oh, my gosh. >> can you believe this? the dash camera catches everything. rolls over on its side. and flips. apparently the translation in korean is great. roll it again. we'll just have some fun. but apparently the driving instructor says "brake, brake, brake!" [ bleep ], what do we do? what do we do? as the car starts turning over on its side. right about here. okay. >> oh, oh, oh. >> he says, what are you doing, don't know which gas pedal you are pressing! i'm going crazy! get out of this car! >> i could have done the translation from what she was doing. you can hear her go oh, oh, oh, oh. >> it sounds the same in any language, the expletive. doesn't it? >> oh, oh, oh. >> failed in seven seconds. worst driver ever! >> and over again. >>> here is a video you are going to want to watch. this one is great. group of young youtubers, true story asa team have posted a video of themselves, they usually -- they're pranksters. this time they changed up the tone. this
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
understand that we have a lot of partners there joining us. .ost: brookhaven, mississippi republican. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing pictures and to do all and how kinds of things. i do not think you all should be doing this. stoph y'all would please showing this on tv. terrorists watch tv. i am highly upset. host: go ahead. guest: maybe i can give you can' come for. this is at a 30,000 foot level. there are much more details that go into it than what i can even describe your today. that there is a great deal of security in and around the ports and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. host: all the information is public information? guest: it is. host: at what point does the government come into play? what it is here, who takes over security? host: security is a joint venturer. when it is under water it is mainly coast guard. when it reaches the earth it is port authority and customs. reporting scanning and certain it isners that open it, federally managed. the state portion as to make sure they are secure. republican caller. hi,
in this effort. >> host: republican line, brookhaven, mississippi. >> caller: yeah, this is mary. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing security staff, showing security staff. you are showing pictures and everything. expected tell them how to get badges and all kinds of things. i don't think john should be doing this. i wish you would please, please telling this on tv. terrorist watch tv. i'm highly upset. >> host: abcaeight. all right. >> guest: maybe i can give you a little bit of comfort. where i have done today is the 30,000-foot level. much, much more detail that goes into it than what i can't even describe today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the port and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. it does need funding to continue that effort. >> host: of the information you told us i assume is public information. >> guest: it is. >> host: the role of the coast guard and security. at what point did they come into play? and then once the ship is here, who takes over security at that point? >> guest: securit
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
separation of the mississippi river basin from the great lakes, hoping against hope to stop the advance of one very aggressive fish, a fish that is just one part of a far bigger problem. our cover story is reported now by mark strassman. >> reporter: meet the king of the illinois river. >> wow. reporter: and a big show-off. mask lar. ... muscular. very muscular. >> reporter: i mean, this thing will hurt you. >> yes, yes. it can jump out of the water at high speeds. they can jump a great distance out of the water, up to eight feet out of the water. >> reporter: fast, easy to startle, and voracious eaters, asian silver carp are a jarring sight here and a hit on youtube tube. but fisheries research scientist greg sass says in the long history of this water way what's also remarkable is when this fish got here. just 20 years ago. >> by the mid 2000's it was becoming a crisis. not only were fish jumping everywhere but what was showing up in our catches, the amount of asian carp versus the native fishes. >> reporter: just amazing how wide it is. with no natural predators in this stretch of th
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
. in wasn't mississippi. it was not too-- it was a different kind of state. this is punitive. it's vindictive. it's vengeful. it's just a way-- there is no evidence of any voter fraud of anybody using somebody else's identification to vote. if there were, you could say it's an over-reaction. this is a created fabrication to basically discourage, if not make impossible, voting by groups, people who belong to groups who don't ordinarily vote republican, who vote democratic. 56% of the people in north carolina voted on election day. early voting rather. there will be no early voting. it's just an attempt to make it difficult to vote. >> i guess i sort of agree. i would say two things. first, one of the great stories in american history and in the south in the last couple of years, couple of decades, is the gradual empowerment and franchisement of african americans. i think one's basic attitude is you don't want to be on the wrong side of that story. so i do think if you're supporting this, you're putting yourself on the wrong side of that story. having said that, do i think it's a h
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
. because of that there are still flash flood warnings and regular warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the potential for more flooding. also the threat of severe storms from southeastern montana into parts of kansas where we could end up with large hail and damaging winds. a few tornadoes are possible but they should be brief. this is most likely later this afternoon and into this evening. the plains really do not need anymore rain right now. >> absolutely. it could be a busy weather day. >>> straight ahead, the fbi let informants commit over 5600 crimes. powerball is over $400 million. >>> a frightening report of what dirty car sellers are doing that only a trusted mechanic can save you from. "first look" is back in three. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. h
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